The Alliance

Spotlight Series

The Alliance Spotlight Series is a recurring one-page publication for front-line healthcare professionals, offering quick-takes on critical topics affecting the field of organ donation and transplantation. We encourage you to download these issues and share them with your front-line colleagues and partners.

Spotlight Series Past Issues

Exclusive Access

Take advantage of our 2021 professional partnership levels of support to receive exclusive early access to The Alliance Insight Series publications.

You’ll still have access to all our materials when they go online one month after publication.

*Bronze Circle is a one-time introductory level for first-time Professional Partner organizations. While this opportunity carries limited benefits, it is intended to provide introductory access to The Alliance’s diverse programs and learning solutions. Current Professional Partners are exempt from this option.
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With the goal of improving the quality of life for diverse populations, the National Organ, Eye, and Tissue Donation Multicultural Action Group (NMAG) established an initiative known as “National Minority Donor Awareness Month,” to raise awareness about donation and transplantation within multicultural communities.

August is National Minority Donor Awareness Month

With the goal of improving the quality of life for diverse populations, the National Organ, Eye, and Tissue Donation Multicultural Action Group (NMAG) established an initiative known as “National Minority Donor Awareness Month,” to raise awareness about donation and transplantation within multicultural communities. On a collective pursuit to save and heal more lives, the donation and transplantation healthcare continuum recognizes this observance annually in August. This year, we celebrate its 25th Anniversary.

Learn the Facts: Statistics Impacting Donation and Transplantation

Spotlight Chart 07 2021
Source: OPTN Data as of July 2021
  • 60% of patients needing a life-saving transplant are non-white, diverse populations.
  • African Americans have higher rates of diabetes and high blood pressure, placing them at risk for organ failure, particularly kidney failure.
  • American Indians and Alaska Natives are more likely to develop hepatitis C, which can result in liver failure.
  • The incidence rate for chronic liver disease among Hispanics and Latinos is twice as high in comparison to whites, and they are also twice as likely to die as a result
  • Native Hawaiians and Pacific Islanders are at higher risk of diabetes and cardiovascular disease. They also have higher obesity rates and are seven times more likely to be diagnosed with chronic liver disease, placing them at high risk of organ failure.
  • Asian Americans have less prevalence of diabetes and heart disease, but suffer significantly from liver disease and hepatitis, placing them at risk for organ failure.

Did You Know: You Can Make a Difference

As a healthcare professional, and as an individual, there are steps you can take to make a difference to push the needle forward.

  • Notify your organ procurement organization (OPO) as soon as you identify a potential organ, eye, and tissue donor following your clinical triggers. Even if you are unsure about their medical suitability, notify your OPO. They will be able to determine suitability and guide you through the rest of the process.
  • Take care of yourself! Pursue healthy living and disease prevention strategies to decrease your likelihood of needing a transplant.
  • Register to be an organ, eye, and tissue donor and inform your family of your decision: Visit RegisterMe.org.
  • Download social media resources from https://www.donatelife.net/nmdam/ and encourage your friends and family to register and share their wishes.

A Special Thanks to This Series’ Contributors

Hedi Aguiar
Speaker
Hedi Aguiar
RN, MSN, CCRN-K
Program Consultant
Organ Donation and Transplantation Alliance
Deanna Fenton
About the Editor |
Deanna Fenton

Deanna is a knowledgeable and versatile professional with diverse experiences in healthcare, client relations, marketing, project management and demonstrated skills in leadership and advocacy. Prior to joining The Alliance, she worked in Hospital Development at her local OPO in the state of New Jersey where she served as the clinical liaison to a number of Level 1 Trauma & Neuroscience centers as well as community hospitals. Her personal connection as a donor family and friend fuels her passion to support her colleagues across the donation-transplantation continuum through the development of valuable educational resources that ultimately boost performance and improve outcome measures. Deanna holds a Bachelor of Arts in Psychology and a minor degree in Public Health from Montclair State University. In her spare time, Deanna enjoys visiting vineyards, spending time with her family, and traveling in hopes of visiting all seven wonders of the world.

Advancing All.

The Alliance is not a membership organization and therefore relies on annual voluntary financial support from OPOs and transplant programs who find value in our programs and initiatives.

We invite you to join us as a 2021 professional partner

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